You are viewing 8 posts in the category Farmers' Market by the author Monica Lo

2016 Farmers Market and Philly Food Bucks Report

In 2016, The Food Trust operated 22 farmers markets in Philadelphia, most of which were located in areas lacking access to affordable, nutritious food. Additionally, eight farm stands run by community partners and urban farmers participated in the Philly Food Bucks program. Through Philly Food Bucks, SNAP recipients increased their purchasing power to buy fresh, local produce by 40%. 


To learn more about the impact of The Food Trust's farmers markets and Philly Food Bucks program, read the full report


Clark Park Farmers Market Chosen to Represent Pennsylvania by USA Today

From USA Today

50 States: 50 Farmers Markets

May brings farmers markets back outdoors in major cities across the country, and we're showcasing a gathering of local growers and makers in each state to kick off the season. Shop, cook and eat seasonally with produce, spreads, goods and bread in your region at these destination events, from the various vendors open daily at Nashville Farmers Market and New Orleans' French Market, to Saturday markets in California, Kansas and Kentucky.


Find other travel-worthy farmers markets in each state across America. 


Convenient Stores Bringing Healthy Food to Underserved Areas

USA TODAY: Special Edition

"At least 19 million Americans live in food deserts at least a mile from a grocery store in urban areas and 10 miles from a store in rural regions, according to USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS). Congress mandated the study of food deserts, also known as low-income, low-supermarket-access census tracts, as part of the 2008 Farm Bill, said Shelly Ver Ploeg, an ERS economist. But it takes more than adding shiny new markets in these neighborhoods to address this thorny problem, Ver Ploeg said. In fact, the number of supermarkets in the U.S. actually increased between 2010 and 2015. But the number of lowincome households and those without cars also increased — meaning healthy food often was still out of reach for many."


Read the full article here


Interview with Nija Rivera, The Food Trust's PA Food Bucks Coordinator

the gastrognomes

"I knew that I wanted to work in food (and public health) when I realized there was an actual term for what I had known existed in Philadelphia all my life. I grew up in Philadelphia, but unlike many residents, I had the fortune of growing up near a supermarket. It was located in a suburb that bordered my neighborhood in Northwest Philly, a section called Cedarbrook. As a child, I remember my mother pointing out that in other sections of the city, residents did not have access to a supermarket.

Fast forward about 15 years, when in graduate school I learned that there was an epidemic of chronic disease in communities with limited access to healthy, affordable food. These places were called “food deserts.” I remember having an ‘aha’ moment and thinking to myself, “You mean to tell me this thing has a name??!!”

Access to healthy, affordable (and delicious) food seems like common sense to me – a very simple concept. That’s why focusing my work on food access, especially in under served communities, just makes sense to me…why shouldn’t everyone have access to healthy food? (Also, I love to eat. LOVE IT.)"

-Nija Rivera


Learn more about Nija and the work she does to improve access to healthy affordable food in the rest of her interview


Headhouse Named One of America's Top 50 Farmers Markets by Cooking Light Magazine

Cooking Light Magazine

“[Headhouse Farmers Market] is a very well-managed market with a great balance of truly committed vendors: meats, sustainable fish, fresh produce, coffee. I can just about fully live off that market and just buy toothpaste somewhere else.” —Chef Aimee Olexy, Talula’s Garden, Philadelphia, PA

Read more here.


The New York Times: The Decline of 'Big Soda'

The New York Times

Taped on the glass refrigerator doors were signs warning customers about the calories contained in the products inside. “Did you know it takes 65 minutes of dancing to work off a bottle of soda?” one said. The signs are part of the healthy corner store initiative sponsored by the Food Trust, a local nonprofit that works to promote nutritious food and coordinates closely with the city. (“Choose water!” urged another, handwritten sign.)

Many urban residents do their shopping in corner stores, and the Food Trust certifies stores, helping them find and sell healthier foods.

“We don’t do much with campaigns to decrease soda,” said John Weidman, the organization’s deputy executive director. “These guys have such small profit margins that you have to couch everything in terms of, ‘This will help your bottom line.’ ” In other words, the organization doesn’t urge stores to stop selling soda. Instead, he said, the goal is to nudge customers toward healthier options, like water and low-fat milk. “It’s mostly about getting them to try healthier alternatives,” he said.


Read more via The New York Times.


Celebrating Progress, Accelerating Change: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Commits $500 million over the next 10 years

Celebrating Progress, Accelerating Change

Helping all children grow up at a healthy weight is an integral part of building a Culture of Health in every community across the United States. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation will commit $500 million over the next 10 years to expand efforts to ensure that all children in the United States—no matter who they are or where they live―can grow up at a healthy weight. Together we have been able to put childhood obesity on the map as an urgent, national priority. Now there are signs we’re turning the tides on childhood obesity rates in younger children. These signs of progress are happening in schools and communities across the nation.

Video features President Bill Clinton, former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher, former Let's Move Executive Director Sam Kass, Executive Director of The Food Trust Yael Lehmann, and others.

Read the full press release here.


Reviving the fading tradition of family dinner

Newsworks The Pulse

On a Saturday this summer, staff from The Food Trust and cookbook author Leanne Brown led a tour of the market in Philadelphia's Clark Park.

The duo acted as tag-team pitchmen hawking the wonders of grilled asparagus and the benefits of seasonal fruits and vegetables.

Brown's cookbook "Good and Cheap" is for people who live on a food stamp budget and The Food Trust is on a mission to get nutritious food to more city people.

Listen to the segment here.


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