You are viewing 36 posts by the author Monica Lo

Women's Health Magazine: "Why Eating Healthy Remains a Privilege Many People Cannot Afford"

Women's Health Magazine

According to the USDA, an estimated total of 13.6 million Americans live in areas that are considered food deserts, and a recent study that examined social media posts about food suggests that a person’s proximity to a healthy food store does impact the healthiness of their meals—the researchers found that only 33 percent of posts from people in food deserts mention fruits and vegetables, compared with 48 percent of posts from people in non-food deserts.

“The challenges for families that lack access to healthy food are vast,” Gabriella Mora, a Senior Associate in Policy and Government Affairs at The Food Trust, tells WomensHealthMag.com. “Imagine a scenario where a single, working mom with young children and no car is having to take two buses and a train and travel an hour each way just to get to the closest grocery store. That’s actually a pretty common scenario, and that inequity creates a lot of barriers to making healthy food choices, since it’s likely much simpler to get to something that’s closer by, but an unhealthy food choice.”

“For a lot of kids,” she adds, “it’s way easier to get a grape soda than a handful of grapes, or an orange soda than an actual orange.”

The Food Trust, which was founded in Philadelphia in 1992, specializes in bringing healthy food access to underserved populations throughout the country. Mora works as a policy advocate for the Healthy Food Financing Initiative, which provides financial incentives for businesses to open in healthy food stores in underserved areas, and is a key component of Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move campaign, which aims to lower childhood obesity rates.

Read more here

Tags: article

The New York Times: The Decline of 'Big Soda'

The New York Times

Taped on the glass refrigerator doors were signs warning customers about the calories contained in the products inside. “Did you know it takes 65 minutes of dancing to work off a bottle of soda?” one said. The signs are part of the healthy corner store initiative sponsored by the Food Trust, a local nonprofit that works to promote nutritious food and coordinates closely with the city. (“Choose water!” urged another, handwritten sign.)

Many urban residents do their shopping in corner stores, and the Food Trust certifies stores, helping them find and sell healthier foods.

“We don’t do much with campaigns to decrease soda,” said John Weidman, the organization’s deputy executive director. “These guys have such small profit margins that you have to couch everything in terms of, ‘This will help your bottom line.’ ” In other words, the organization doesn’t urge stores to stop selling soda. Instead, he said, the goal is to nudge customers toward healthier options, like water and low-fat milk. “It’s mostly about getting them to try healthier alternatives,” he said.


Read more via The New York Times.


10 nonprofits led by The Food Trust are working collectively to make kids healthier

Young Leaders for a Healthier Generation

GSK and The Philadelphia Foundation announced the award of a three-year, $5 million charitable grant to Get HYPE Philly!, a collective of 10 nonprofits headed by The Food Trust. Working together, the nonprofits will focus on enabling Philadelphia teens to eat healthy, exercise and build healthier communities. The grant is from a fund established by GSK in 2011 to benefit young people in the City of Philadelphia, and is administered by The Philadelphia Foundation.

For more information visit: gethypephilly.org


Celebrating Progress, Accelerating Change: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Commits $500 million over the next 10 years

Celebrating Progress, Accelerating Change

Helping all children grow up at a healthy weight is an integral part of building a Culture of Health in every community across the United States. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation will commit $500 million over the next 10 years to expand efforts to ensure that all children in the United States—no matter who they are or where they live―can grow up at a healthy weight. Together we have been able to put childhood obesity on the map as an urgent, national priority. Now there are signs we’re turning the tides on childhood obesity rates in younger children. These signs of progress are happening in schools and communities across the nation.

Video features President Bill Clinton, former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher, former Let's Move Executive Director Sam Kass, Executive Director of The Food Trust Yael Lehmann, and others.

Read the full press release here.


Phillies All-Star shortstop Jimmy Rollins announces support for HYPE-- The Food Trust's youth leadership program

Metro Philly

Phillies All-Star shortstop Jimmy Rollins and his wife, Johari Rollins, joined a gymnasium full of South Philadelphia eighth-graders for a special assembly as part of The Food Trust’s HYPE (Healthy You. Positive Energy) youth leadership program. Jimmy and Jahari shared their secrets to eating healthy and staying active; students also had the opportunity to ask Jimmy and Johari questions about how they stay healthy as a family.
 

A Passion for Community Health―And Pride

preventobesity.net

Inside Track continues a series of interviews with members of the Strategic Advisory Committee of Voices for Healthy Kids, a joint initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and American Heart Association, exploring their various contributions to the fight against childhood obesity.

PreventObesity.net Leader Dwayne Wharton was born and raised in Philadelphia and grew up in a community that was, as he recalls, “uneven.”

Read more here.


Reviving the fading tradition of family dinner

Newsworks The Pulse

On a Saturday this summer, staff from The Food Trust and cookbook author Leanne Brown led a tour of the market in Philadelphia's Clark Park.

The duo acted as tag-team pitchmen hawking the wonders of grilled asparagus and the benefits of seasonal fruits and vegetables.

Brown's cookbook "Good and Cheap" is for people who live on a food stamp budget and The Food Trust is on a mission to get nutritious food to more city people.

Listen to the segment here.


Old City Night Market

From Fox 29

The Food Trust Night Market staff and Old City Night Market vendor, Prime Stache are interviewed about Old City Night Market.

See here.


Night Market Outdoor Street Festival In Old City Kicks Off

From Fox 29

The Night Market Outdoor Street Festival kicked off in Old City on Thursday.

Dozens of vendors are gearing up for a celebration of food and music.

The festival showcases the city’s diverse neighborhoods and food by partnering with local restaurants, food trucks, regional musicians and dynamic artists.

The Night Market will be held on four Thursday evenings, in four different neighborhoods.

After the Old City Market on Thursday, May 15th the festival continues with Night Markets in West Oak Lane on June 19, on Lancaster Avenue on August 21 and back in Chinatown on October 2.


Philly's 'Night Market' makes delicious return

"The arrival of warm weather in Philadelphia means the start of 'Night Market'
It's a great summer tradition, and the first of this year's events took place in Old City. They call it 'the roving street food festival,' and there was plenty of food to choose from."

Read more


New program brings healthcare to your corner store

From 6abc

A new pilot program in Philadelphia aims to help improve people's health by setting up inside local corner grocery stores.

"I can think of no better place than a corner store in the neighborhood, unannounced, where folks come to have a nice conversation in a place they are comfortable with," said Dr. Jim Plumb, Jefferson Center for Urban Health.

Read more


Olivares Food Market Goes the Extra Mile to Serve the Community

From Salud America

Before Olivares Food Market began selling and promoting healthier food options, the store looked like an average corner store. But Clara Santos soon learned she could make some changes that would impact the whole community.

Read more


Neighborhood Grocery Stores Combat Obesity, Improve Food Perceptions

From Health Affairs Blog

The Cummins et al article “New Neighborhood Grocery Store Increased Awareness of Food Access but Did Not Alter Dietary Habits or Obesity,” published in the February issue of Health Affairs, generated considerable media attention, with headlines claiming that grocery stores do not contribute to healthy diets or reductions in obesity. However, the study offered no conclusive proof showing that access to grocery stores is not a part of the solution to preventing obesity.

Read more


Access to Healthy Food Improves Health, Brings Economic Benefits

From Huffington Post

Access to healthy food can bring triple bottom-line benefits to communities -- better health, new jobs, and a revitalized economy. But nearly 30 million Americans still live in low-income areas with limited access to supermarkets. The problem is particularly acute in low-income communities of color.

Read more


Group aims to improve food at Pennsylvania corner stores

From Associated Press

January 2014 -- "We try to get people to try a sample, and in that process we talk to them about eating whole grains, and trying out new things, and showing them where healthy items are in their corner store," said [The Food Trust's] program educator Maria Vanegas.

Read more


New report released on healthy food access and why it matters

Access to Healthy Food and Why It Matters:

cover of access to healthy food

Healthy food retailers—grocery stores; farmers’ markets; cooperatives; mobile markets; and other vendors of fresh, affordable, nutritious food—are critical components of healthy, thriving communities.

A new joint report by PolicyLink and The Food Trust, Access to Healthy Food and Why It Matters, provides an up-to-date review of the research. Three years since our 2010 report, The Grocery Gap: Who Has Access to Healthy Food and Why It Matters, the large volume of new research shows that improving healthy food access in low-income communities and communities of color continues to be an urgent need.

Without access to healthy foods, a nutritious diet and good health are out of reach. And without grocery stores and other fresh food retailers, communities are also missing the commercial vitality that makes neighborhoods livable and helps local economies thrive.

To learn more about why access to healthy food matters please read the executive summary and full report.
 


Stay Informed!

Sign up for our newsletter, The Healthy Food Access Times, and stay up-to-date on the latest policy developments, funding opportunities, best practices and innovative strategies.