Conclusion

HFFI programs are improving the built food environment, community health and economic vitality of underserved rural areas, small towns and urban communities across the country. These programs represent a proven, economically sustainable solution that is bringing fresh food closer to families, providing both job and business ownership opportunities for people of color and promoting equity in the neighborhoods and areas they serve.

Advocates, funders and researchers understand, however, too many Americans struggle bring healthy food into their homes and onto their tables. Sustained advocacy efforts and continued investment in HFFI projects and programs will enable neighborhoods, cities and towns across the country to experience the transformation gained by better access to grocery stores and other fresh food outlets, positive impacts on community health and job creation. At the same time, robust evaluation and the dissemination of project and program impacts across the country will be critical to efforts.

Together, we can ensure that all families have equitable access to healthy and affordable foods, curb the epidemic of diet-related disease disproportionately affecting our nation’s most vulnerable citizens and drive economic development in the communities and areas that need it most.


Next Section: Appendices and Works Cited

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